August is weird, so more summer movies.

I’ve gotten to the point of summer-induced restlessness that going to the movies is a form of release, an escape from this never-ending August and a stifling apartment. This week, I saw my first-ever film at Lincoln Plaza Cinemas, which is a gem of a theater – it’s near Lincoln Center, one of my favorite parts of the city, and shows smaller, independent films. And while at most big theaters – your Regals and AMCs – take you up, up, up (I do love the escalator ride to a high-level theater at the Times Square AMC) there is something wonderful about going underground to the theaters at Lincoln Plaza. The box office is right on the street, and all the theaters are inside, below.

I saw the new documentary “Best of Enemies,” and I just got the feeling that most of us in the audience were there for some kind of summer escape. Probably 50% of us were there alone, and while I have no idea what brought each individual to the theater that night, I like to think it was a combination of not having a partner willing enough to sit through such a micro-niche film, and just wanting to get out of damn house.

If you have a love for retro TV graphics, you’ll adore “Best of Enemies.” Actually, there are a lot of other reasons to love it, but that was what I found initially attractive. The 60s were so crazy! The documentary explored the William F. Buckley vs. Gore Vidal debates staged by ABC after each night of the 1968 nominating conventions. It was a genius programming idea at the time – something to boost ABC in the ratings and separate it from the other networks doing the same wall-to-wall convention coverage.

They had a great range of talking heads coloring the conversation – the one I found most interesting was a linguist from Columbia University who shed light on Buckley and Vidal’s voices. They spoke in an educated tone, bordering on a British accent, and it would be unthinkable for an intellectual voice like that to be taken seriously on TV today. I thought that was an interesting element to highlight.

There were interesting anecdotes from their personal lives, as well. I went into it knowing the names Buckley and Vidal, but didn’t really know concrete things about them, and now I do. It was interesting to hear about their personal and political sides, from biographers, writers and my personal favorite, Dick Cavett.

The documentary paints the Buckley-Vidal debates as the direct cause of today’s proliferation of talking heads and debate surrounding political conversation, which I don’t know if I entirely buy, but it raises some interesting points. Right before I saw the film, I listened to John Powers’ review on Fresh Air, and I found Dick Cavett’s contributions as a talking head especially interesting in light of what Powers said: “In the grand historical sweep, the Vidal-Buckley encounter’s true meaning isn’t really political. Rather, it marked the end of the days when literary figures and public intellectuals still had prestige. Days when writers like Vidal, Buckley, Norman Mailer, Truman Capote and James Baldwin – all men, you’ll notice – could actually be regular guests on the Tonight Show.” Even if today’s media debate doesn’t directly descend from Buckley-Vidal, it’s at least interesting to view it in light of the idea.

And speaking of late-night, the other best piece of media I consumed this week was GQ’s Stephen Colbert cover story. I can hardly wait for September 8 now, when his Late Show begins. I mourned (well, still mourn) Letterman’s departure but this story has turned my curiosity about what Colbert’s show will look like into excitement over what it could be.

I never watched The Colbert Report, save for a few clips here and there, and I kind of regret that I didn’t get into politics before the Colbert-Jon Stewart era was nearing its end. BUT. Colbert is fascinating. This was a great profile and it was also Colbert letting it be a great profile through what he revealed and how he revealed it. He was disarming.

“Here. Look at this. The Death Mask of Agamemnon.”

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